Slider

Bulgarian Food: Dishes You Need On Your 'Must Eat' Bucket List

Rate this item
(0 votes)

Lukanka

If you’re looking for a quick snack or appetiser in Bulgaria, your best bet is to grab a roll or slice yourself some Lukanka. A traditional salami, Lukanka is the Bulgarian variant of the Italian soppressata.

bulgarian foods starters salami

Perfect for snack time, and great to carry on a picnic

Lukanka is great as a snack, to eat with veggies or with cheese over drinks. The salami is a mix of meat and fat, cured with spices and herbs before it is cased and dried out. Every region in Bulgaria has its own unique way of making Lukanka, and some even patent their local Lukanka at the Bulgarian patent office!

Shkembe (Tripe Soup)

Bulgarians love soup and salad. The shkembe is a traditional Bulgarian soup made from tripe. If you look at a Bulgarian cookbook, chances are ‘Shkembe’ will be one of the first recipes you come across. So “What is tripe?” you may be thinking. If you remember what it is, chances are you’re wondering what it may be like in a soup.

Don’t miss the beautiful clay pot or ‘Gyuvetch’ that the soup is served in!

For the uninitiated, tripe is, of course, the thick stomach lining found in the bellies of cattle. But wait. Before you get grossed out, learn more about it! This traditional recipe is made by boiling cut or minced tripe for several hours with paprika, milk, and oil. Apparently, the more the paprika the better the shkembe. Little known fact: The shkembe isn’t just a traditional soup, it also doubles as a post-drinking snack to settle the stomach, and is a great hangover cure.

 

Tarator: Cool Cucumber Soup

When you literally need to feel as cool as a cucumber.

A summer refresher for the Bulgarians, Taratov is always go-to at the start of any meal. Legend has it that the recipe for the soup was stolen from the Greeks and appropriated by Bulgarians after adding a little water. Look for Bulgarian food online and this is probably one of the first things you’ll find.

This fantabulous soup contains cucumber, yoghurt, garlic, dill, and water. Sort of like a watered down version of traditional finger food dip, and super refreshing. Hardcore meat lovers may prefer the Bulgarian beef soup, Teleshkov Vareno, but Tarator is always a classic.

Read 250 times
This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This document reflects the views only of the author and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein.
© 2019 TradiFlavours Project. All Rights Reserved.